Plexus Pink Drink: Ingredients & Science of Plexus Slim

By Hans

Plexus Slim (better known as Pink Drink) boldly proclaims on the package: “Clinically Demonstrated to Help You Lose Weight”

But is that really true?

Does Plexus Slim work to lose weight? Why does it work?

Is Plexus Pink Drink scientifically proven to help you lose weight? (Short answer: Kinda.)

What are the Plexus Slim Active Ingredients?

I did a deep dive into hundreds of scientific studies to answer those questions! Let’s get started.

About Plexus Pink Drink

Person holding a glass of pink drink

Plexus Slim is a popular weight-management supplement manufactured by Plexus Worldwide – a dietary supplement company. Plexus Slim, often known as the pink drink or Plexus Slim Hunger Control, is a flavored powder supplement intended to help with weight loss, suppress appetite, and reduce cravings.

What is Plexus Slim used for?

Plexus Slim is a nutritional supplement that is primarily intended for weight loss or “weight management”. Some of the touted benefits of Plexus Slim are:

  • Glucose & Insulin: It supports the healthy metabolism of glucose & healthy insulin levels
  • Appetite: It helps to reduce appetite & promotes feeling full
  • Gut Health: It also promotes nourishing good gut flora & maintaining a healthy digestive tract.
  • Anything that ails you: Plexus Ambassadors are notorious for asking what problems you’re having and then hinting that the Pink Drink can fix that problem

Plexus Slim Ingredients

Plexus Slim Pink Drink Nutrition Label, Ingredients Label, and Supplement Facts
Plexus Slim Nutrition Label, Ingredients Label, and Supplement Facts

Each serving of Plexus Slim (“the pink drink”) contains the following ingredients. I’ve bolded the active ingredients that scientific studies have shown have at least a small positive effect on weight loss.

  • Chromium – 200 mcg
  • Xylooligosaccharide – 1000 mg
  • Green coffee bean extract / chlorogenic acid
  • Caffeine
  • Garcinia cambogia
  • Alpha lipoic acid (ALA)
  • Mulberry fruit extract
  • Citric Acid
  • Natural Flavors
  • Stevia Leaf (Stevia rebaudiana) Extract
  • Beet Root Extract and other fruit and vegetable juice (for color)
  • Cellulose Gum
  • Silicon Dioxide

Plexus gets a little tricky and doesn’t tell you how much of the green coffee extract, garcinia cambogia, ALA, or mulberry fruit extract they put in each serving. They categorize that under a proprietary “Plexus Slim blend” of which they include 531 mg without specifying the ratios. This is probably because they don’t want folks making their own cheaper Plexus Slim alternative with the same active ingredients.

Plexus and many other folks believe that garcinia cambogia has a positive effect on weight loss, but scientific studies have not been able to demonstrate any effect, which is why I don’t have it bolded.

However, all of the bolded ingredients above have been shown to have a positive effect on weight loss, blood sugar regulation, and metabolism!

Scientific Studies on Effectiveness of Pink Drink Ingredients

Pink medicinal powder

Let’s take each active ingredient of Plexus Slim one-by-one and look at the scientific literature. I’m leaning heavily on the work of Examine.com and Kamal Patel, MPH (Masters of Public Health) who summarize each of these studies in a standardized way.

Chromium

Chromium is an active ingredient found in Plexus Slim. The scientific literature shows the following benefits:

  • ⬇️ Blood Sugar (Glucose) ⬇️ slight decrease 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
  • ⬇️ Appetite ⬇️ slight decrease 16

Anything that keeps your blood sugar down is generally good for giving you even energy throughout the day. Blood sugar spikes lead to insulin spikes which lead to storing the blood sugar as fat instead of using it as energy. That’s why protein and fat are the best macronutrients for weight loss, because they are digested slowly and release blood sugar over time.

Outside of weight-loss-related issues, Chromium also helps on average with a wide variety of ailments and boosts your health in a number of small ways:

  • ⬆️ Heart health (QTc intervals) ⬆️ small increase 17
  • ⬆️ Immune system ⬆️ small boost 18
  • ⬆️ Libido ⬆️ slight boost 19
  • ⬇️ Acne ⬇️ slight reduction 20
  • ⬇️ Bipolar and depression symptoms ⬇️ slight reduction 21 22 23 24 25
  • ⬇️ Excessive hair growth ⬇️ slight reduction (on the off chance that’s a problem for you!) 26

Green coffee extract (Chlorogenic Acid)

Green coffee extract (Chlorogenic Acid) is an active ingredient found in Plexus Slim. The scientific literature shows the following benefits:

  • ⬇️ Weight ⬇️ slight loss 27 28
  • ⬇️ Body fat ⬇️ slight decrease 29
  • ⬇️ Insulin ⬇️ slight decrease 30
  • ⬇️ Blood glucose ⬇️ slight decrease 31
  • ⬆️ Glycemic control ⬆️ slight improvement 32

Green coffee extract high in chlorogenic acid also had the following benefits not related to weight loss:

  • Heart health ⏫ improved in 2x ways: homocysteine reduction, vascular function improvement 33
  • Blood pressure ⏬ notable decrease 34
  • ⬆️ Subjective well-being ⬆️ – slight improvement 35

Green coffee extract (Caffeine)

Coming soon!

Garcinia Cambogia

Garcinia Cambogia is a fruit that was long believed to help suppress appetite, but it wasn’t clear if this was due to a specific molecule called hydroxycitric acid (HCA) or just the taste of the fruit. In the 1970s, a study in rats showed that it reduced food intake and weight gain, leading to its popularity as a fat-loss supplement, most notably in the product Hydroxycut. However, subsequent studies in humans failed to find any benefits of Garcinia Cambogia for fat loss or appetite suppression. Apparently, there is a unique chemical pathway around appetite and fat storage found in rats but not humans that causes this difference in effect. Turns out we’re not identical to rats in every way.

Alpha-Lipoic Acid (ALA)

Alpha-Lipoic Acid (ALA) is a great supplement that Tim Ferriss recommends in his book The 4-Hour Body. Science and Plexus Pink Drink both agree with his recommendation, providing the following benefits according to a number of double-blind studies which show benefits for weight-loss:

  • ⬇️ Weight ⬇️ slight decrease 36 37 38
  • ⬇️ Lipid Peroxidation ⬇️ slight decrease 39
  • ⬆️ Blood Sugar Management (HbA1c) ⬆️ slight improvement 40
  • ⬆️ Muscle Creatine Content ⬆️ slight increase, making muscle gain easier 41

Outside of weight-loss, there are a plethora of other benefits:

  • Heart Health ⏫ slight improvement in 2x areas: Inflammation, Blood Flow 42 43
  • ⬆️ General Oxidation ⬆️ slight improvement in this key health area that impacts cardiovascular health, metabolic health, diabetes, obesity, your immune system, and much more 44 45 46 47 48
  • ⬆️ Cellular Aging ⬆️ slight improvement: Protein Carbonyl Content 49
  • ⬆️ Nerve Repair ⬆️ slight improvement 50
  • Diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms ⏫ notable improvement 51 52

Mulberry Fruit Extract

In this study, researchers looked at the effect of mulberry fruit extract (MFE) on post-meal blood sugar and insulin levels in 84 healthy Indian men and women. The study included two separate trials, in which the participants consumed different doses of MFE with boiled rice. The results showed that adding MFE to rice reduced post-meal blood sugar and insulin levels compared to consuming rice without MFE. These effects were seen with doses as low as 0.37 grams of MFE. The researchers did not observe any negative side effects from consuming MFE. This suggests that MFE may be a useful way to reduce post-meal blood sugar and insulin levels, potentially helping to reduce the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

When to take Plexus Slim

Doing Yoga with a bottle of Plexus Slim Pink Drink

Plexus Slim should be taken up to two times daily, per the label, for optimum benefits. When combined with water and taken 30 to 60 minutes before a meal (breakfast, lunch, or dinner), this powdered supplement reduces appetite. It also goes by the name “Pink Drink” since it becomes pink when mixed with water before consumption.

Directions to use

Plexus Slim functions best in the morning to reduce appetite. You can take it in many ways depending on your needs.

Open a packet, rip out the contents, and pour them into a 12 to 20-ounce glass of water or a water bottle. Stir the powder and water thoroughly using a spoon (if you’re using a glass) or shake the bottle.

Note: You don’t need to measure the powder because Plexus Slim comes in individual-size pouches.

Is Plexus Slim safe to use?

While the Plexus Slim Hunger Control supplement hasn’t undergone any formal Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs, the gold standard of medical safety testing), the Plexus Slim ingredients have been shown to be safe in dozens of scientific studies.

In a nutshell, Plexus supplement consumption is probably safe for healthy people.

You should check the ingredients to make sure you’re not allergic to any of them. Those with sensitivity to caffeine are the most likely to be impacted.

Possible Side Effects of Plexus Slim

Crazy cook brewing up a pink drink the kitchen

After taking Plexus Pink Drink, some consumers report experiencing the following side effects:

  • Nausea
  • Stomach ache
  • Headache
  • Constipation
  • Fatigue
  • Gas
  • Bloating
  • Increased bowel movements

Who can use Plexus Pink Drink?

Athletic runner with huge pink drink

Any healthy person can take Plexus Slim – but it is advisable always to consult your healthcare provider whenever you want to try a dietary supplement, regardless of its popularity.

Who should not use Plexus Slim

Because Plexus Slim contains the stimulant caffeine, any healthy individual who is sensitive to it should be cautious.

According to Plexus, pregnant or breastfeeding women should speak with their doctor before using Plexus Slim. This is universally true of pregnant or breastfeeding women for any supplement.

Children or teenagers should not use Plexus products unless formulated explicitly for them.

Additionally, the U.S. National Library of Medicine advises against consuming green coffee products if you have anxiety, high blood pressure, bleeding disorder, or glaucoma because it can worsen these symptoms. Use caution if you have a heart issue because consuming green coffee products may also increase your homocysteine levels, which are linked to heart disease.

Pros & Cons of Plexus Slim

ProsCons
✔️ Ingredients have a small, positive effect on weight loss
✔️ Generally safe to use
✔️ Good taste, fun ritual
❌ Extremely expensive: overpriced for the effect
❌ Has some minor side effects
❌ Better supplements available
❌ Often touted to cure things that it doesn’t

Frequently Asked Questions

Does Plexus Pink Drink make you lose weight?

Plexus claims that Pink Drink Plexus has been scientifically proven to help you lose weight. And there are some decent quality scientific studies that show the Pink Drink makes a small difference in weight management. However, you will need to eat right and exercise to actually move the needle that matters.

How many Plexus Slims can you drink a day?

Plexus Slim’s packaging instructions instruct mixing one packet with 12–20 ounces of water and taking it twice daily. Plexus Slim is best taken 30 minutes before a meal (breakfast, lunch, or dinner) to be optimally effective.

Is Plexus Slim FDA-approved?

Plexus Slim Microbiome Activating is a dietary supplement that is not FDA-approved for any health claims. For any supplement to be FDA approved, it must undergo drug testing.

Will Plexus Pink Drink give me diarrhea?

Some consumers report experiencing nausea, headache, stomach ache, constipation, gas, or bloating after taking Plexus Slims. It can also cause increased bowel movements. However, it should not cause diarrhea.

What should I eat while taking Plexus Slim?

You should maintain a healthy and balanced diet while taking Plexus Slim for effective outcomes. You should focus on good sources of proteins like fish, eggs, meat, poultry, nuts, beans, etc. Vegetables are also essential for your body as they are high in vitamins, minerals, and fibers.

Does Plexus Slim help with bloating?

Plexus Slim itself doesn’t help with bloating – in fact, it can cause it! However, Plexus Bio Cleanse can help you reduce bloating, gas, and gastrointestinal discomfort. It can also relieve constipation and help you cleanse your GI tract.

Is there aspartame in Plexus Pink Drink?

Plexus Slim does not use any artificial sweeteners like aspartame, sucralose, saccharin, or xylitol.

Is Plexus Slim a laxative?

Plexus Slim itself isn’t a laxative. However, its sister product, Plexus Bio Cleanse can have a laxative effect for most people.

Does Plexus Slim lower blood sugar?

Pink Drink’s chromium, chlorogenic acid, and mulberry fruit extract all work together to control insulin levels and keep blood sugar at healthy levels.

Why am I gaining weight on Plexus Slim?

You may gain weight while using Plexus Slim if you’ve not changed your diet or adopted healthy habits. Pink Drink has a very small effect on weight loss, per scientific studies. Combining Plexus Slim with a balanced diet and regular exercise is advisable to get substantial results.

Conclusion

Plexus Pink Drink might be a good choice for your weight-loss journey.

While it does have good ingredients that do help some with weight loss, the difference is small. There are only a handful of supplements that really move the needle on weight loss and sadly the Pink Drink doesn’t contain them all.

Plexus Slim is also extremely expensive, so you’d be better off with some cheaper, generic alternatives.

Last but not least, a balanced and calorie-restricted diet and regular exercise will always be the most important element of any effective weight loss plan.

Footnotes

  1. Martin, Julie et al. “Chromium picolinate supplementation attenuates body weight gain and increases insulin sensitivity in subjects with type 2 diabetes.” Diabetes care vol. 29,8 (2006): 1826-32. doi:10.2337/dc06-0254
  2. Paiva, Ana N et al. “Beneficial effects of oral chromium picolinate supplementation on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes: A randomized clinical study.” Journal of trace elements in medicine and biology : organ of the Society for Minerals and Trace Elements (GMS) vol. 32 (2015): 66-72. doi:10.1016/j.jtemb.2015.05.006
  3. Sharma, Shilpi et al. “Beneficial effect of chromium supplementation on glucose, HbA1C and lipid variables in individuals with newly onset type-2 diabetes.” Journal of trace elements in medicine and biology : organ of the Society for Minerals and Trace Elements (GMS) vol. 25,3 (2011): 149-53. doi:10.1016/j.jtemb.2011.03.003
  4. Gunton, Jenny E et al. “Chromium supplementation does not improve glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, or lipid profile: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of supplementation in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance.” Diabetes care vol. 28,3 (2005): 712-3. doi:10.2337/diacare.28.3.712
  5. Racek, Jaroslav et al. “Influence of chromium-enriched yeast on blood glucose and insulin variables, blood lipids, and markers of oxidative stress in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus.” Biological trace element research vol. 109,3 (2006): 215-30. doi:10.1385/BTER:109:3:215
  6. Ghosh, Debjani et al. “Role of chromium supplementation in Indians with type 2 diabetes mellitus.” The Journal of nutritional biochemistry vol. 13,11 (2002): 690-697. doi:10.1016/s0955-2863(02)00220-6
  7. Anderson, R A et al. “Elevated intakes of supplemental chromium improve glucose and insulin variables in individuals with type 2 diabetes.” Diabetes vol. 46,11 (1997): 1786-91. doi:10.2337/diab.46.11.1786
  8. Cefalu, William T et al. “Characterization of the metabolic and physiologic response to chromium supplementation in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus.” Metabolism: clinical and experimental vol. 59,5 (2010): 755-62. doi:10.1016/j.metabol.2009.09.023
  9. Vrtovec, Matjaz et al. “Chromium supplementation shortens QTc interval duration in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.” American heart journal vol. 149,4 (2005): 632-6. doi:10.1016/j.ahj.2004.07.021
  10. Król, Ewelina et al. “Effects of chromium brewer’s yeast supplementation on body mass, blood carbohydrates, and lipids and minerals in type 2 diabetic patients.” Biological trace element research vol. 143,2 (2011): 726-37. doi:10.1007/s12011-010-8917-5
  11. Pei, Dee et al. “The influence of chromium chloride-containing milk to glycemic control of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.” Metabolism: clinical and experimental vol. 55,7 (2006): 923-7. doi:10.1016/j.metabol.2006.02.021
  12. Abdollahi, Mohammad et al. “Effect of chromium on glucose and lipid profiles in patients with type 2 diabetes; a meta-analysis review of randomized trials.” Journal of pharmacy & pharmaceutical sciences : a publication of the Canadian Society for Pharmaceutical Sciences, Societe canadienne des sciences pharmaceutiques vol. 16,1 (2013): 99-114. doi:10.18433/j3g022
  13. Kleefstra, Nanne et al. “Chromium treatment has no effect in patients with type 2 diabetes in a Western population: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.” Diabetes care vol. 30,5 (2007): 1092-6. doi:10.2337/dc06-2192
  14. Lai, Ming-Hoang. “Antioxidant effects and insulin resistance improvement of chromium combined with vitamin C and e supplementation for type 2 diabetes mellitus.” Journal of clinical biochemistry and nutrition vol. 43,3 (2008): 191-8. doi:10.3164/jcbn.2008064
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  16. Cefalu, William T et al. “Characterization of the metabolic and physiologic response to chromium supplementation in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus.” Metabolism: clinical and experimental vol. 59,5 (2010): 755-62. doi:10.1016/j.metabol.2009.09.023
  17. Vrtovec, Matjaz et al. “Chromium supplementation shortens QTc interval duration in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.” American heart journal vol. 149,4 (2005): 632-6. doi:10.1016/j.ahj.2004.07.021
  18. Rhee, Y S et al. “The effects of chromium and copper supplementation on mitogen-stimulated T cell proliferation in hypercholesterolaemic postmenopausal women.” Clinical and experimental immunology vol. 127,3 (2002): 463-9. doi:10.1046/j.1365-2249.2002.01697.x
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  27. Watanabe, Takuya et al. “The blood pressure-lowering effect and safety of chlorogenic acid from green coffee bean extract in essential hypertension.” Clinical and experimental hypertension (New York, N.Y. : 1993) vol. 28,5 (2006): 439-49. doi:10.1080/10641960600798655
  28. Thom, E. “The effect of chlorogenic acid enriched coffee on glucose absorption in healthy volunteers and its effect on body mass when used long-term in overweight and obese people.” The Journal of international medical research vol. 35,6 (2007): 900-8. doi:10.1177/147323000703500620
  29. Thom, E. “The effect of chlorogenic acid enriched coffee on glucose absorption in healthy volunteers and its effect on body mass when used long-term in overweight and obese people.” The Journal of international medical research vol. 35,6 (2007): 900-8. doi:10.1177/147323000703500620
  30. van Dijk, Aimée E et al. “Acute effects of decaffeinated coffee and the major coffee components chlorogenic acid and trigonelline on glucose tolerance.” Diabetes care vol. 32,6 (2009): 1023-5. doi:10.2337/dc09-0207
  31. Watanabe, Takuya et al. “The blood pressure-lowering effect and safety of chlorogenic acid from green coffee bean extract in essential hypertension.” Clinical and experimental hypertension (New York, N.Y. : 1993) vol. 28,5 (2006): 439-49. doi:10.1080/10641960600798655
  32. Thom, E. “The effect of chlorogenic acid enriched coffee on glucose absorption in healthy volunteers and its effect on body mass when used long-term in overweight and obese people.” The Journal of international medical research vol. 35,6 (2007): 900-8. doi:10.1177/147323000703500620
  33. Ochiai, Ryuji et al. “Green coffee bean extract improves human vasoreactivity.” Hypertension research : official journal of the Japanese Society of Hypertension vol. 27,10 (2004): 731-7. doi:10.1291/hypres.27.731
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